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Appalachian Film Workshop/Appalshop Films collection, 1969-Present

details | guide | text

Author

Processed by Shawn Lind, Caroline Rubens, Dwight Swanson; machine-readable finding aid created by Caroline Rubens

Title

Appalachian Film Workshop/Appalshop Films collection

Date

1969-Present

Repository

Appalshop Archive, Appalshop, Inc.

Arrangement

TheAppalachian Film Workshop/Appalshop Films collection, 1969-Presentis arranged in series by principal subject matter of completed film productions:

I. African Americans II. Artisans III. Coal Mining IV. Economy V. Education VI. Environment VII. Folk Culture VIII. Health IX. Labor X. Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts XI. Media and Cultural Identity XII. Music XIII. Politics and Government XIV. Religious Life and Customs XV. Rural Life and Social Conditions XVI. Social Life and Customs XVII. Youth

Conditions Governing Access note

For information regarding access to the collections please contact the Appalshop Archivist at (606) 633-0108.

Preferred Citation Note

Accession number: [identification of item], Appalachian Film Workshop/Appalshop Films collection, 1969-Present, Appalshop Archive.

Extent

1550 film containers; 51 containers of soundtrack; 1810 audio reels; 3220 videotapes; 113 audio cassettes; 50 digital audio tapes; 170 slides

Abstract

The Appalachian Film Workshop/Appalshop Films collection, 1969-Present consists of audiovisual material recorded by Appalshop media makers between 1969 and the present, covering all aspects of life in Central Appalachia. Appalshop is located in the Appalachian town of Whitesburg, Kentucky. The organization began in 1969 as a branch of the New York-based Community Film Workshop Council to train youth in high unemployment areas in film and video production. Over the years Appalshop filmmakers have recorded a wide range of subject matter including coal mining, labor strikes, subsistence farming, traditional crafts, musical expressions, storytelling and environmental issues. Since its founding the organization has expanded from a film training and production company into a national multi-media arts and cultural center.

Biography/History

Appalshop is a multi-media arts and cultural center located in Central Appalachia. The organization began in 1969 as a branch of the New York-based Community Film Workshop Council (CFWC) founded by the American Film Institute. A grant from the Office of Economic Opportunity supported vocational programs in film and video production to train minorities and youth in communities with high unemployment. CFWC workshop sites were located primarily in urban areas with a few rural sites. The Community Film Workshop of Appalachia was established in the coalfield town of Whitesburg, Kentucky (population 1,200). With limited jobs in media available locally, the expectation was that the Appalachian trainees would leave the area to find work in cities where the media industry existed. However, a core group of workshop trainees regarded their growing media literacy as a tool for countering negative, stereotypical portrayals of rural people in mainstream media.

In 1970 the Community Film Workshop of Appalachia severed its ties with the CFWC and incorporated as the Appalachian Film Workshop, soon shortened to Appalshop. A management and governance structure was established, and in 1972 the organization received an infusion of funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities. This funding led to the production of new documentaries, increased distribution of films, and an expansion of the reputation of the workshop, which attracted new trainees and media activists as well as artists from other fields. Appalshop filmmakers have produced films about all aspects of life in central Appalachia including coal mining, labor strikes, subsistence farming, traditional crafts, musical expressions, storytelling and Appalachian literature, religious practices, politics, and environmental issues.

Over its 40 years the organization has expanded from a film training and production company into a national multi-media arts and cultural center. Other divisions include: Headwaters Television, creating programming for local and public television broadcast (see finding aid for the Early Headwaters Television collection), June Appal Recordings, producing and distributing music and spoken-word audio of and from central Appalachia (see finding aid for the June Appal Records collection); Roadside Theater, a professional ensemble company creating a body of drama based on the history and lives of Appalachian people and collaborating with others nationally who are dramatizing their local life; WMMT-FM, a non-commercial, community-based radio station that celebrates the culture and voices the concerns of people living in the Appalachian region and rural America; and the Appalachian Media Institute, a leadership development and civic engagement program that uses media training for youth to explore and address the complex issues facing central Appalachia. The organization has also been active in multidisciplinary educational, interpretive, exchange and training activities that employ its body of work, including over 80 albums/cassettes/CDs; 100 films/videos; 6 national radio series; 5 touring photo exhibits; 55 theater productions and co-productions; and 4 books).

Scope and Content

TheAppalachian Film Workshop/Appalshop Films collection, 1969-Presentconsists of 16mm color and black and white film, video, and audio images recorded by Appalshop filmmakers between 1969 and the present, covering all aspects of life in Central and Southern Appalachia.

The collection items range from camera original media shot during production to edited, titled masters of completed films (the term "film" is used in this finding aid to describe a completed, edited work regardless of production format). Outtakes from a film (interviews, b-roll, etc) may address subject matter beyond the work's central themes. A detailed inventory of moving image elements is available through the Appalshop Archive.

The collection also contains unprocessed: paper material including production logs, transcripts, photographs, and other documents created during production which illuminate the films and filmmaking process; audiovisual material recorded by Appalshop filmmakers for productions that were never completed; and completed productions for which Appalshop filmmakers were contracted by third parties. For more information regarding the unprocessed portion of the collection please contact the Archive.

Subjects

  • Appalshop Films
  • Frontier Nursing Service, inc.--History.
  • Pittston Coal Company
  • Union Carbide Corporation.
  • Carter family--Interviews.
  • Fiction films
  • Nonfiction films
  • Appalachian dulcimer music
  • Appalachian Region, Southern--Politics and government.
  • Appalachian Region--Economic conditions.
  • Appalachian Region--Fiction.
  • Appalachian Region--Social conditions--20th century.
  • Appalachian Region--Social life and customs--20th century.
  • Big Sandy River (Ky. and W. Va.)
  • Kentucky Economic conditions 20th century.
  • Kentucky--Politics and government--1951-
  • Kentucky--Social life and customs.
  • Knox County (Ky.)
  • Letcher County (Ky.)
  • Pound Mountain Massacre, Va., 1892
  • West Virginia--Economic conditions.
  • Wise County (Va.)
  • Arnow, Harriette Louisa Simpson, 1908-1986
  • Carter, Janette
  • Dickens, Hazel.
  • Ewald, Wendy
  • Gunning, Sarah Ogan, 1910-1983
  • Hicks, Ray, 1922-2003.
  • Ledford, Lily May, 1917-
  • Niles, John Jacob, 1892-1980
  • Perkins, Carl Dewey, 1912-1982
  • Sexton, Lee
  • Sexton, Morgan, 1911-
  • Stanley, Ralph
  • Wooten, George
  • Workman, Nimrod
  • African Americans--Appalachian Region, Southern--Social conditions.
  • African Americans--Appalachian Region--History.
  • African Americans--Appalachian Region--Music.
  • Amateur circus
  • Appalachians (People)--Biography.
  • Appalachians (People)--Ethnic identity.
  • Appalachians (People)--Folklore.
  • Appalachians (People)--Interviews.
  • Appalachians (People)--Kentucky--Biography.
  • Appalachians (People)--Kentucky--Social conditions.
  • Appalachians (People)--Kentucky--Social life and customs.
  • Appalachians (People)--North Carolina--Interviews.
  • Appalachians (People)--Songs and music.
  • Appalachians (People)--Tennessee.
  • Appalachians (People)--Virginia.
  • Appalachians (People)--West Virginia.
  • Art, American--Kentucky--20th century
  • Artisans--Appalachian Region.
  • Ballads, American
  • Banjo music--Appalachian Region.
  • Basketball for girls.
  • Bluegrass musicians--Biography.
  • Bluegrass musicians--United States--Interviews
  • Butchers.
  • Caving.
  • Chemical plants--Accidents--Environmental aspects
  • Clearcutting--Environmental aspects--Appalachian Region.
  • Coal mine accidents--Kentucky--Martin County.
  • Coal mine accidents--West Virginia--Buffalo Creek (Logan County)--History--20th century
  • Coal mine waste
  • Coal miners as artists
  • Coal miners--Appalachian Region, Southern--Social life and customs.
  • Coal miners--Appalachian Region--1960-1980
  • Coal miners--Appalachian Region--Interviews.
  • Coal miners--Labor unions--Organizing
  • Coal miners--West Virginia--Interviews.
  • Coal mines and mining--Appalachian Region--History.
  • Coal mines and mining--Appalachian Region--Songs and music.
  • Coal mines and mining--Environmental aspects
  • Coal mines and mining--Environmental aspects--United States
  • Coal mines and mining--Kentucky
  • Coal mines and mining--Kentucky--Fiction
  • Coal mines and mining--Law and legislation--United States
  • Coal mines and mining--Waste disposal
  • Coal trade--Appalachian Region.
  • Coal--Transportation--Kentucky
  • Coal--Transportation--Law and legislation
  • Cockfighting
  • Community activists.
  • Community life--Appalachian Region, Southern.
  • Community television
  • Company towns--Appalachian Region, Southern--History.
  • Coon Creek Girls (Musical group)
  • Cornhusk craft
  • Country music--Appalachian Region.
  • Dance--Social aspects.
  • Distilling, Illicit--Appalachian Region.
  • Documentary films--Social aspects.
  • Dyslexic children--Education.
  • Ecotourism--Appalachian Mountains Region.
  • Education, Rural--Appalachian Region.
  • Environmental disasters--Economic aspects.
  • Family farms--Economic aspects.
  • Family farms--Kentucky.
  • Farm life--Appalachian Region, Southern.
  • Fiddle tunes--Appalachian Region.
  • Flea markets.
  • Folk artists--Appalachian Region, Southern--Biography.
  • Folk dance music--Appalachian Region.
  • Folk music--Appalachian Region.
  • Folk songs--Appalachian Region.
  • Furniture making.
  • Gospel music--Appalachian Region.
  • Gourds--Utilization.
  • Gristmills
  • Hand weaving--Appalachian Region--History.
  • Hand weaving--Patterns.
  • Hazardous wastes--Environmental aspects--Kentucky.
  • Herbs--Folklore.
  • Herbs--Therapeutic use--Appalachian Region.
  • HIV-positive women--United States--Biography.
  • Hymns, English--Appalachian Region.
  • Jack tales.
  • Labor unions--Appalachian Region.
  • Logging--Economic aspects--Appalachian Mountains.
  • Lungs--Dust diseases--Law and legislation--United States.
  • Marijuana industry--Government policy--Kentucky.
  • Medicine, Rural
  • Midwifery--Kentucky.
  • Mineral rights
  • Mountain life--Appalachian Region.
  • Mountain life--Kentucky--Letcher Region.
  • Old Regular Baptists--Appalachian Region.
  • Old time fiddle band music from Kentucky
  • Old-time music--Appalachian Region
  • Oral history--Appalachian Region, Southern.
  • Orchards
  • Place-based education--Appalachian Region.
  • Pottery craft--United States.
  • Quilting--Patterns
  • Quiltmakers--Kentucky.
  • Rural conditions.
  • Rural health clinics
  • Rural health services--Appalachian Region.
  • Rural health services--Effect of managed care on
  • Rural schools--Appalachian Region.
  • Rural youth--Kentucky--Attitudes.
  • Rural youth--Kentucky--Social conditions.
  • Rural-urban migration.
  • Seamstresses
  • Square dance music--Kentucky.
  • Stereotypes (Social psychology)--Appalachian Region.
  • Storytelling--Appalachian Region, Southern.
  • Strikes and lockouts--Coal mining--Kentucky
  • Strikes and lockouts--Coal mining--United States
  • Strip mining--Appalachian Region.
  • Strip mining--Environmental aspects--Appalachian Region.
  • Strip mining--Law and legislation
  • Strip mining--Appalachian Region--Public opinion.
  • Subsistence farming
  • Tales--Appalachian Region.
  • Tobacco farmers--Kentucky.
  • Traditional medicine.
  • Traditional music of southern Appalachia
  • Veterans--Appalachian Region.
  • War finance--Moral and ethical aspects.
  • Women coal miners--Appalachian Region--Interviews.
  • Women country musicians
  • Women food service employees.
  • Women--Appalachian Region--Social conditions.
  • Women's shelters--Appalachian Region, Southern.

Collection Inventory

African Americans
82 video tapes; 14 audio reels; 47 audio cassettes
Scope and Content Note:

This series contains Appalshop films that focus on bi-racial communities and the experiences of African Americans in the Appalachian region. Contents include: masters of finished films; unused original video and audio material recorded during production (outtakes); slides and audio tapes created for a slideshow; untitled masters; and video dubs. Media formats include: slides; 1/4" audio reel; audio cassette; and 1" open reel, 3/4" U-matic, D2, and Betacam SP videotape.

A more detailed inventory of moving image elements for each film is available. Please contact the Appalshop Archive for further information.

Clinchco: Story of a Mining Town
[box: 1]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 30-minute black and white documentary Clinchco: Story of a Mining Town, a 1982 release directed by Susie Baker. Originally produced as a slideshow, this film chronicles a bi-racial, company-controlled coal camp in Clinchco, Virginia. It examines the history of black and white settlement and union organizing at the camp and looks at contemporary conditions. Included are interviews with retired miners and their families and photographs from family albums. Subjects include Appalachian African Americans, race relations, coal company towns, labor history, urban development, and social conditions in the Appalachian region.

Evelyn Williams
[box: 2]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 28-minute color documentary Evelyn Williams, a 1995 release directed by Anne Lewis. The film is a portrait of Evelyn Williams, an Appalachian African American and activist. Williams is interviewed about her childhood in the 1920s in Kentucky, recollections of cross-burnings by the Ku Klux Klan and a lynching, her marriage to a coal miner, her work cleaning the homes of coal company officials, and her subsequent move to New York and education at the New School for Social Research. The film chronicles her contemporary work with Kentuckians for the Commonwealth, an environmental group, to protest oil and gas company use of the broadform deed to drill on surface owners' land in eastern Kentucky. Subjects include Appalachian African American women, race relations, civil rights community activism, environmental justice, coal mines, and environmental conditions of the Appalachian region.

His Eye is on the Sparrow
[box: 3]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 28-minute color documentary His Eye Is On the Sparrow, a 1999 release directed by Anne Lewis. The film profiles gospel singer Ethel Caffie-Austin. Austin is interviewed and performs spirituals, hymns and contemporary gospel songs. She is shown teaching gospel to a youth group, ministering to inmates at a state prison, and leading the choir at the Black Sacred Music Festival in Institute, WV. Oral history, archival material, and interviews are combined with performance footage to chronicle Austin's life. Subjects include Appalachian African Americans, Appalachian women, gospel singers, and gospel music of the Appalachian region.

Mabel Parker Hardison Smith
[box: 4]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 29-minute color documentary Mabel Parker Hardison Smith, a 1985 release directed by Anne Lewis. The film profiles Mabel Parker Hardison Smith, a church organist, gospel singer and teacher of 35 years in eastern Kentucky. In interviews she discusses her family history in the deep South, their migration to the mountains, and life in the segregated coal camps. Widowed while pregnant with her third child, she describes how she went to college and became a teacher despite personal and financial difficulties. Subjects include Appalachian African Americans, Appalachian women, coal mining, coal camp segregation, and rural education.

Artisans
117 film containers; 6 containers of soundtrack; 188 audio reels; 73 videotapes
Scope and Content Note:

This series contains Appalshop films that document practitioners of traditional arts and handicrafts in the Appalachian region. Contents include: masters of finished films; unused original film, video and audio material recorded during production (outtakes); workprint, audio mix, and pre-print film elements; projection film prints; untitled masters; and video dubs. Media formats include: 16mm film; 16mm magnetic track; 1/4" audio reel; and 1" open reel, 3/4" U-matic and Betacam SP videotape.

A more detailed inventory of moving image elements for each film is available. Please contact the Appalshop Archive for further information.

Chairmaker
[box: 1]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 22-minute color documentary Chairmaker , a 1975 release directed by Rick DiClemente. The film closely documents the work of 80-year old Dewey Thompson, a chairmaker from Sugarloaf Hollow, Kentucky. Thompson is shown crafting a rocking chair from the cutting of lumber to a finished piece as he offers occasional commentary on his life and the craft of making chairs. Subjects include handicrafts, artisans, furniture making, and social life and customs in rural Kentucky.

Hand Carved
[box: 2]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 88-minute color documentary Hand Carved, a 1981 release directed by Herb e. Smith. The film profiles master chairmaker Chester Cornett and follows Cornett as he cuts down a tree on the site of his family home in Appalachia, transports the wood to Cincinnati where he lives, and builds an eight-legged double rocking chair by hand. He is shown chopping, whittling, and carving and he describes his apprenticeship with his grandfather and uncle, the personal and economic reasons why he left the mountains, and the artisan's place in a consumer market for mass-produced objects. . Subjects include Appalachian artisans, furniture making, and rural-urban migration.

Minnie Black's Gourd Band
[box: 3]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 28-minute color documentary Minnie Black's Gourd Band, a 1988 release directed by Anne Lewis. The documentary profiles 89-year-old African American artist Minnie Black from East Bernstadt, Kentucky. Black is shown growing gourds in her backyard garden. She discusses the secrets to growing good gourds and shows her gourd art including a double-headed donkey and "griffen" beast. She is shown attending "the World's Largest Gourd Convention" in Mt. Gilead, Ohio where fellow artists hail her as "the queen of the gourd people." Interspersed throughout are versions of hymns and old songs played by Minnie and her Senior Citizen Gourd Band. Subjects include Appalachian Appalachian African Americans, Appalachian women, gourds, artisans and folk art of the Appalachian region.

Morgan County Sorghum Festival
[box: 4]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 12-minute color documentary Morgan County Sorghum Festival, a 1974 release directed by Bert Morgan. The film documents an annual sorghum festival in Morgan County, Kentucky focusing on three craftspeople: a knife maker, a broom maker, and a woman who spins her own yarn. The making of sorghum molasses is also featured. Subjects include social life and customs, artisans, and handicraft in the Appalachian region.

Oaksie
[box: 5]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 22-minute color documentary Oaksie, a 1979 release directed by Anthony Slone. The film is a portrait of eastern Kentucky basket maker, fiddler, and harp player Oaksie Caudill. Caudill is shown making a basket from start to finish: selecting the "right" tree, splitting and pressing the white oak, whittling the ribs, and weaving the oak strips together. Interspersed with Caudill's basket-making is his fiddle and harp playing. Caudill's musical style evolved from early Baptist church music: each low action of the bow hits one note-the lead note or melody of the song-mimicks the sound of a human singing voice. Subjects include artisans, basket making, and old time fiddle and harp music of the Appalachian region.

Sarah Bailey
[box: 6]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 29-minute color documentary Sarah Bailey, a 1984 release directed by Anne Lewis. The documentary is a portrait of Bailey, a weaver and corn shuck artist from Bledsoe in Harlan County, Kentucky. She is shown working on her corn shuck dolls and flowers, and teaching corn shuck art and weaving in an Elderhostel program at the Pine Mountain Settlement School in Pine Mountain, Kentucky. In interviews she discusses her beginnings as an artist and the role of the Pine Mountain Settlement School in helping her to establish a market for her work. She also discusses raising most of what she eats out of her garden, teaching herself to card and spin wool, and growing up in the days of a barter economy in the mountains. Subjects include cornhusk craft, rural life, social life and customs, economic conditions, and women of the Appalachian region.

Unbroken Tradition: Jerry Brown Pottery
[box: 7]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 28-minute color documentary Unbroken Tradition: Jerry Brown Pottery, a 1989 release directed by Herb E. Smith. The film documents the work of ninth-generation southern stoneware tradition potter and National Heritage Fellowship Award-recipient Jerry Brown of Hamilton, Alabama. He is shown digging his own clay, preparing it with a mule driven pug mill, working the clay into a twenty seven pound churn on his wheel, and glazing and firing it in his wood powered kiln. In interviews he discusses the role of pottery as a family tradition passed down through the generations. Subjects include pottery craft of the Appalachian region.

Coal Mining
85 film containers; 22 containers of soundtrack; 406 audio reels; 296 videotapes; 4 audio cassettes
Scope and Content Note:

This series contains Appalshop films that focus on the lives of coal miners, the coal industry, and the effect of coal mining on the communities, culture and environment of the Appalachian region. Contents include: masters of finished films; unused original film, video and audio material recorded during production (outtakes); workprint, audio mix, and pre-print film elements; preservation elements; projection film prints; untitled masters; and video dubs. Media formats include: 16mm film; 16mm magnetic track; 1/4" audio reel; audio cassette; and ½" open reel, 3/4" U-matic, Hi-8, Betacam SP and Digital Betacam videotape.

A more detailed inventory of moving image elements for each film is available. Please contact the Appalshop Archive for further information.

Buffalo Creek Flood: An Act of Man
[box: 1]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains materials related to the 40-minute black and white documentary Buffalo Creek Flood: An Act of Man, a 1975 release directed by Mimi Pickering. The film documents a 1972 flood caused by a coal waste dam break in southern West Virginia that released a flood of sludge, debris and water that caused the deaths of 125 people and left 4,000 without homes. The film includes footage of the flood and its aftermath. Interviews with survivors, representatives of union and citizen's groups, and officials of the Pittston Company explore the emotional effect of the disaster on residents, the cause of the flood, and whether the company had advanced knowledge of the dam break hazard and were in violation of state and federal regulations. This film was placed on the National Film Registry in 2005. Subjects include coal mine waste, environmental disasters, Pittston Coal Company, and rural conditions in the Appalachian region.

Buffalo Creek Revisited
[box: 2]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 31-minute color documentary Buffalo Creek Revisited, a 1984 release directed by Mimi Pickering. The film, a sequel to Buffalo Creek Flood: An Act of Man, profiles a West Virginia community 10 years after a coal waste dam break caused the deaths of 125 people and destroyed hundreds of homes. Through interviews with survivors, planners, politicians, psychologists, and community activists, the film explores the psychology of disaster, the difficulty of rebuilding community after an environmental disaster, the role of community in people's lives, and impact of corporate activities on economically depressed communities and the environment. Subjects include coal mine accidents, rural conditions, environmental aspects of coal mining and community activism in the Appalachian region.

Coal Bucket Outlaw
[box: 3]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 27-minute color documentary Coal Bucket Outlaw, a 2002 release directed by Tom Hansell. The film looks at the economics of the coal industry by profiling Kentucky coal truck drivers. A veteran driver who owns his own truck is interviewed about his work and is filmed driving up one-lane roads, tight hollows, onto strip mines, and around coal processing facilities. The film also interviews a young family that owns its own coal truck company about their difficulties in making a profit. Both subjects comment on how the economics of the coal business demand that they violate laws, such as weight limits for coal trucks. Facts and figures about coal as an energy source and dependence on fossil fuels place the struggles of the drivers in a national context. Subjects include the coal trade, coal transportation in Kentucky and environmental aspects of fossil fuels.

Coal Miner: Frank Jackson
[box: 4]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 12-minute black and white documentaryCoal Miner: Frank Jackson, a 1971 release directed by Ben Zickafoose. A coal miner is interviewed about his personal recollections of union organizing and mining work.  Includes underground mining footage, including the riding of a 'low boy' cart into the entryway of a deep mine. Subjects include Kentucky coal miners and underground coal mining in the Appalachian region.

Coalmining Women
[box: 5]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 40-minute color documentary Coalmining Women, a 1982 release directed by Elizabeth Barret. The film examines women coal miners, the conditions that lead them to seek employment in a traditionally male-dominated industry, and the problems they encounter once hired. The women are interviewed and are shown bolting mine roofs, shoveling beltlines, hauling rock dust, and performing other underground mining work. Subjects include women coal miners and the social conditions of Appalachian women.

Nimrod Workman: To Fit My Own Category
[box: 6]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 35-minute black and white documentary Nimrod Workman: To Fit My Own Category, a 1975 release directed by Scott Faulkner and Anthony Slone. The film profiles 83-year old West Virginian ballad singer Nimrod Workman, a recipient of the NEA's National Heritage Award. He is shown at his home as he and his family prepare meals, build an addition to the house, dig for yellow root, and trade jokes with neighbors. Workman discusses his recollections of coalmining and union organizing in the 1920s and '30s with Mother Jones. It also includes performances of traditional ballads and original songs by Workman. Subjects include coal miners as artists, as labor union organizers, social life and customs of West Virginia, American ballads and issues related to aging.

On Our Own Land
[box: 7]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 29-minute color documentary On Our Own Land, a 1988 release directed by Anne Lewis. The film explores the effects in Appalachia of the "broad form deed," a 100-year old legal provision that separates the ownership of mineral rights from ownership of the surface land, and enables mineral deed owners to perform strip mining without the consent of surface owners. The film documents the efforts of a group of Kentucky citizens to have the broad form deed declared unconstitutional in the state of Kentucky. Subjects include mineral rights, the coal trade in Appalachia, Kentucky politics and government, and community activism.

Sludge
[box: 8]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the color documentary Sludge, a 2005 release directed by Robert Salyer. The film recounts the break of a coal waste dam in October 2000 during which 306 million gallons of sludge spilled into the Tug River in Martin County, Ky. The spill damaged municipal water systems and caused extensive property damage. Through interviews with community residents and officials, public hearings, and video footage the film documents the aftermath of the disaster, the Mine Safety and Health Administration "whistle blower" case of Jack Spadaro, and the threat of coal sludge ponds throughout the Appalachian mountains. Subjects include environmental aspects of coal mining, coal mine waste, coal slurry, and coal mine accidents in Kentucky.

Stripmining in Appalachia
[box: 9]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 25-minute black and white documentary Stripmining in Appalachia, a 1973 release directed by Gene DuBey. The film examines the effects of surface mining on the environment and rural communities in southeastern Kentucky and southwestern Virginia. It includes interviews with a mine operator, residents whose homes have been affected by mining practices, and aerial footage of stripped mountains. Subjects include strip mining and the coal industry, environmental aspects of strip mining, and rural conditions.

Stripmining: Energy, Environment, and Economics
[box: 10]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 50-minute color documentary Stripmining: Energy, Environment, and Economics, a 1979 release directed by: Frances Morton and Gene DuBey. The documentary looks at the history of this controversial mining method and a citizens' movement to regulate strip mining that culminated in passage of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Subjects include strip mining, environmental and economic aspects of coal mining, and coal mining law and legislation.

To Save the Land and People
[box: 11]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 58-minute color documentary To Save the Land and People, a 1999 release directed by Anne Lewis. The documentary recounts the organized efforts of eastern Kentuckians to counter increased strip mining of coal in Appalachia in the 1960s and 1970s. It traces the history of early grassroots efforts to stop strip mining in eastern Kentucky, and focuses on the Appalachian organization To Save the Land and People, a group of community activists who oppose the practice of strip mining. Subjects include the coal trade, environmental aspects of strip mining, community activism, and environmental justice.

Economy
152 film containers; 125 audio reels; 140 videotapes; 7 audio cassettes
Scope and Content Note:

This series contains Appalshop films that focus on family-owned businesses, socio-economic conditions and alternative economies in the Appalachian region. Contents include: masters of finished films; unused original film, video and audio material recorded during production (outtakes); workprint, audio mix, and pre-print film elements; preservation elements; projection film prints; untitled video masters; and video dubs. Media formats include: 16mm film; 16mm magnetic track; 1/4" audio reel; audio cassettes and 1" open reel, 3/4" U-matic, Hi-8, D2, Betacam SP and Digital Betacam videotape.

A more detailed inventory of moving image elements for each film is available. Please contact the Appalshop Archive for further information.

Applewise
[box: 1]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains materials related to the 29-minute color documentary Appalwise, a 1997 release directed by Anthony Slone. The film profiles a family-run apple orchard. A third-generation family of apple growers is shown maintaining and managing one of only two remaining family-run apple orchards in Wise County, Virginia. Through interviews and footage the film documents the growing seasons and how family members try to keep the orchard business profitable while struggling with pesticide issues and sustainability. Subjects include sustainable agriculture and land management, pesticide use and family farms in the Appalachian region

Beyond Measure: Appalachian Culture and Economy
[box: 2]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains materials related to the 58-minute color documentary Beyond Measure, a 1995 release directed by Herb E. Smith. The film examines the demographic, economic, and political influences that shape the Appalachian region. Includes interviews with people of Native American, Anglo, and African descent about mining, farming, and unionization. Subjects include economic conditions, social conditions, cultural pluralism and coal mining and the coal trade in the Appalachian region.

Bluegrass, Black Market
[box: 3]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains materials related to the 29-minute color documentary Bluegrass Blackmarket , a 1994 release directed by Hans Luxemburger. The film looks at the underground economy that has developed around marijuana cultivation in an economically depressed area of eastern Kentucky. Interviews include: a marijuana grower who demonstrates his techniques for growing the plant and evading the authorities; a prosecuting attorney who discusses the difficulty of trying to convict growers in a community that has come to accept the marijuana trade; and a local newspaper editor on the loss of community pride associated with dependence on an underground economy. Also included is an account of of a large-scale FBI sting operation that led to the arrest of four local sheriffs on drug trafficking charges. Subjects include the rural marijuana industry, social conditions and economic conditions in the Appalachian region.

Grassroots Small Farm
[box: 4]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 29-minute color documentary Grassroots Small Farm, a 1988 release directed by Anne Lewis. The film documents the efforts of families in eastern Kentucky to create small subsistence farms. Cooperative farm families are seen conducting project board meetings, building and operating their own greenhouse, and talking about their plans for expansion. Subjects include subsistence farming and rural conditions in Kentucky and the Appalachian region.

Lord and Father
[box: 5]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 45-minute color documentary Lord and Father, a 1983 release directed by Joe Gray Jr. The film documents the conflicting viewpoints of father and son (the film's director) over profitability and morality in the operation of a Kentucky tobacco farm. The film examines the emotional bonds and economic interdependence of family farming, the economic history of tobacco growing in the United States and of sharecropping, and the social system with which it is allied. Subjects include tobacco farmers, tobacco farming history, and the conflict of generations.

Millstone Sewing Center
[box: 6]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 13-minute color documentary The Millstone Sewing Center, a 1972 release directed by Mimi Pickering. The film documents a community center where local widows and residents work as volunteers to produce new clothes for the poor. Seamstresses describe how they use Office of Economic Opportunity funds and Salvation Army hand-me-downs to make and remodel clothing for poor families in two eastern Kentucky counties. Includes interviews with Center director Mabel Kiser on how she conceived of the Center and located a building, fabrics, and funding. Subjects include Appalachian women, sewing, seamstresses, economic conditions, and rural conditions in the Appalachian region.

Waterground
[box: 7]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 16-minute color documentary Waterground, a 1977 release directed by Frances Morton. The film profiles fifth-generation mill operator Walter Winebarger who runs a family-owned, 100-year old, water-powered gristmill located at Meat Camp, near Boone, North Carolina. He is shown grinding flour and meal using a process that has changed very little since the mill was built. Includes footage of water being diverted from a nearby creek onto an overshot wheel, the operation of the mills gears, belts, and grinding stones, and the bagging of flour. In interviews Winebarger reflects on the history of his mill and the social changes that have affected it. The simplicity of the mill and Winebarger's comments on the difficulties facing small farmers are contrasted with a visit to an industrial General Mills plant in Johnson City, Tennessee. Subjects include gristmills, flour mill equipment and supplies, and small businesses in the Appalachian region.

Education
22 film containers; 75 audio reels; 178 videotapes; 9 audio cassettes
Scope and Content Note:

This series contains Appalshop films that focus on childhood development, school consolidation, model schools, and education issues in rural communities and the Appalachian region. Contents include: masters of finished films; unused original film, video and audio material recorded during production (outtakes); workprint, audio mix, and pre-print film elements; preservation elements; projection film prints; filmstrip kits; untitled masters; video version of filmstrip; and video dubs. Media formats include: 16mm film; 35mm filmstrip; 16mm magnetic track; 1/4" audio reel; audio cassette; and 1" open reel, 3/4" U-matic, and Betacam SP videotape.

A more detailed inventory of moving image elements for each film is available. Please contact the Appalshop Archive for further information.

Hands On: A Year in an Eastern Kentucky Classroom
[box: 1]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 28-minute color documentary Hands On: A Year In An Eastern Kentucky Classroom , a 1992 release directed by Anne Lewis. The documentary chronicles the activities of teacher Linda Oxendine Brown and her 24 second graders during the 1989-90 school year in rural Knox County, Kentucky. The film shows children functioning in a democratically-run learning environment: producing a weekly radio program; writing, editing and publishing a collection of short stories and non-fiction; planting tomatoes; and visiting a classmate's farm. The program also includes Oxendin-Brown's visits to her students' homes and consultations with their parents. Subjects include child development, rural youth, and education in the Appalachian region.

Hard Times in the County: The Schools
[box: 2]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 29-minute color documentary Hard Times in the County: The Schools, a 1988 release directed by Anne Lewis. The documentary looks at the impact of the federal government's War on Poverty on school systems in eastern Kentucky and its limitations in meeting the needs of the region's children. It explores school consolidation in Breathitt County, Kentucky and questions the effectiveness of channeling certain children out of academic programs and into separate vocational schools where they receive training in fields that are limited in the region. Subjects include rural education, schools in the Appalachian region, and economic assistance to the Appalachian region.

I'm What This is All About
[box: 3]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 29-minute color documentary I'm What This Is All About, a 1985 release directed by Anne Lewis with Mimi Pickering. The film documents the effects of a 1980 West Virginia Supreme Court decision mandating an overhaul of the state's schools. Parents in rural Lincoln County, WV are shown campaigning for equitable treatment of their children, for the preservation of community schools, and to protect the jobs of teachers. Subjects include school consolidation, politics and patronage in the school system, education of children with special needs, and rural education in the Appalachian region.

Kingdom Come School
[box: 4]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 22-minute color documentary Kingdom Come School, a 1973 release directed by Dianna Ott. The film follows teacher Harding Ison and his twenty-two students during a typical day at the last one room schoolhouse in Letcher County, Kentucky. Students are shown cross-age tutoring, fixing lunch, working at the chalkboard, and receiving one-on-one instruction from the teacher. Interviews include Ison commenting on the value of one-room schools, and the county school superintendent offering his rationale for further school consolidation. Subjects include school consolidation, rural education and rural youth in the Appalachian region.

Portraits and Dreams
[box: 5]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 17-minute color documentary Portraits and Dreams, a 1984 release directed by Andrew Garrison with Wendy Ewald. Originally produced as a slideshow, the film documents an innovative photography project undertaken by schoolchildren from eastern Kentucky with the help of photographer/educator Wendy Ewald. Five of the young photographers comment on their photos and what they depict. Subjects include the study and teaching of art, young artists, and rural education.

So Was Einstein: A Look at Dyslexic Children
[box: 6]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 29-minute color documentary So Was Einstein: A Look At Dyslexic Children, a 1988 release directed by Anne Lewis. The documentary focuses on four students struggling with dyslexia in eastern Kentucky. It examines tutorial programs that offer one- on-one assistance in contrast to traditional classrooms and special education classes. Special teaching techniques appropriate for students with dyslexia are demonstrated. Includes interviews with students and their families who discuss the guilt, frustration, and misunderstanding that often come with having dyslexia. Subjects include rural education and the education of dyslexic children.

Environment
7 film containers; 6 audio reels; 496 videotapes
Scope and Content Note:

This series contains Appalshop films that focus on the environmental effects of chemical and extractive industries on communities in the Appalachian region. Contents include: masters of finished films; unused original film, video and audio material recorded during production (outtakes); workprint; third-party stock footage; untitled masters; and video dubs. Media formats include: 16mm film; 1/4" audio reel; DAT; audio cassette; and 1" open reel, 3/4" U-matic, Betacam SP and mini DV videotape. A more detailed inventory of media elements for each film is available.

A more detailed inventory of moving image elements for each film is available. Please contact the Appalshop Archive for further information.

Breaks of the Mountain: Russell Fork Gorge
[box: 1]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains materials related to the 28-minute color documentary The Breaks of the Mountain: Russell Fork Gorge, a 1999 release directed by Tom Hansell. The film examines a coalmining community on the Russell Fork of the Big Sandy River in Kentucky. Through interviews and footage the community is documented seeking a route to sustainable development as it weighs the effects of ecotourism and extractive industries on the environment and the rare river gorge at Russell Fork. Subjects include environmental aspects of ecotourism and coal mining in Kentucky, and the Big Sandy River of Kentucky and West Virginia.

Chemical Valley
[box: 2]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the color documentary Chemical Valley, a 1991 release directed by Mimi Pickering and Anne Lewis. The film documents the response of residents in the Kanawha Valley in West Virginia to the Union Carbide disaster in Bhopal, India. Follows events over a five year period regarding the debate over Union Carbide chemical plants located in the West Virginia valley. Through interviews and footage of public meetings and press conferences, the film explores issues of racism, freedom of information, accountability in the chemical industry, and the choice between safety and jobs. Subjects include chemical plant accidents, health effects of hazardous wastes, and rural conditions

Ready for Harvest: Clearcutting in the Southern Appalachians
[box: 3]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 28-minute color documentary Ready for Harvest: Clearcutting in the Southern Appalachians, a 1994 release directed by Anne Lewis. The film explores the history of extensive logging in the forests of the Southern Appalachian Mountains in the early half of the century, and the effects of more recent clearcutting by logging companies. Footage includes interviews with a practitioner of forest management techniques, citizens whose communities have been affected by clearcutting, and an ecologist who argues for the importance of biological diversity to a healthy ecosystem. Subjects include clearcutting, corporate logging practices, and environmental and economic aspects of logging in the Appalachian region.

Yellow Creek, Kentucky
[box: 4]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 29-minute color documentary Yellow Creek, Kentucky, a 1984 release directed by Anne Lewis. The film documents the efforts of the Yellow Creek Concerned Citizens to stop a commercial tannery from disposing of toxic wastes into the creek that flows through their small community near Middlesboro, Kentucky. The film includes interviews with residents who describe health problems in the community, looks at the ties between local government and industry, and documents a local election in which a slate of citizens are elected to the Middlesboro City Council. Subjects include rural health, pollution and hazardous wastes, environmental conditions, local elections, and community activists in the Appalachian region.

Folk Culture
93 film containers; 10 containers of soundtrack; 154 audio reels; 119 videotapes; 1 audio cassette
Scope and Content Note:

This series contains Appalshop films that focus on storytellers, folk dance, practitioners of folk medicine and the social significance of folk culture in the Appalachian region. Contents include: masters of finished films; unused original film, video and audio material recorded during production (outtakes); workprint, audio mix, and pre-print film elements; preservation elements; projection film prints; filmstrip kits; untitled masters; untitled masters, video version of filmstrip; and video dubs. Media formats include: 16mm film; 35mm filmstrip; 16mm magnetic track; 1/4" audio reel; audio cassette; and 1" open reel, 3/4" U-matic, and Betacam SP videotape.

A more detailed inventory of moving image elements for each film is available. Please contact the Appalshop Archive for further information.

Catfish: Man of the Woods
[box: 1]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 27-minute color documentary Catfish: Man of the Woods, a 1974 release directed by Alan Bennett. The film is a profile of Clarence "Catfish" Gray, a fifth-generation herb doctor living near Glenwood, West Virginia. In this day-in-the-life visit, Gray reads letters seeking health advice, gathers herbs and roots from the woods around his house, receives visitors, and relaxes by skinny-dipping in a nearby stream. In interviews Gray discusses his healing techniques and personal philosophy of life. Subjects include mountain life, traditional medicine, social life and customs, and folklore in the Appalachian region.

Fixin' to Tell About Jack
[box: 2]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 25-minute color documentary Fixin' To Tell About Jack, a 1975 release directed by Elizabeth Barret. The film documents storyteller and National Heritage Fellowship Award-winner Ray Hicks, a mountain farmer from Beech Mountain, North Carolina who tells traditional folktales that have been passed down in his family for generations. Hicks is shown working on his farm, gathering herbs in the woods, and describing his family's tradition of storytelling and his theories of human and natural continuity. Hicks is also heard telling a traditional Jack tale called "Whickity-Whack, Into My Sack" (also known as "Soldier Jack"). Subjects include mountain life, Jack tales, folklore, and storytelling in the Appalachian region.

Homemade Tales: Songs and Sayings of Florida Slone
[box: 3]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 28-minute color documentary Homemade Tales: Song & Stories of Florida Slone, a 1993 release directed by Anthony Slone and Angelyn DeBord. The film, made by her son and daughter-in-law, focuses on the life of Florida Slone, a singer and storyteller from southeastern Kentucky. Includes interviews in which Slone discusses her childhood contraction of typhoid fever, ensuing isolation, and how it led to the development of her skill in creating stories and songs. She is shown imitating bird and animal sounds, singing original songs, and telling stories about witches who lived near her as a girl and the visions that guided her as she raised six children. Subjects include women, folklore and folk music of the Appalachian region.

Nature's Way
[box: 4]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 22-minute color documentary Nature's Way, a 1974 release directed by John Long with Elizabeth Barret. The film explores Appalachian practitioners of folk medicine and their methods for curing diseases using herbs and other local cures. People are interviewed about their cures and remedies for various ailments, and are shown preparing folk medications. Also included is footage of an experienced midwife delivering twins. Subjects include traditional medicine, social life and customs, folklore, and midwifery in the Appalachian regionl

Quilting Women
[box: 5]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 28-minute color documentary Quilting Women, a 1976 release directed by Elizabeth Barret. The film documents the process of traditional Appalachian quilting, from cutting out and piecing together the patterns to the quilting bee. Quilters comment on the origins of the generations old patterns, the time and patience required, the satisfaction of accomplishment, quilting as art, and the companionship offered by women working together over a quilting frame. Includes footage of a variety of original quilts. Subjects include social life and customs of women of the Appalachian region, quilting, quilting patterns, and artisans.

Step Back Cindy
[box: 6]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 28-minute color documentary Step Back Cindy, a 1991 release directed by Anne Lewis with Susan Spalding. The documentary looks at traditional dance as a mode of personal and community expression in Appalachia. Square dancers in Fancy Gap, Virginia are shown dancing without callers; in Dante, Virginia dancers flatfoot and hold a cake walk to raise money for the volunteer fire department; and in Chilhowie, Virginia, people are shown socializing at a community dance. Subjects include folk dance and the social aspects of dance in the Appalachian region.

Three Mountain Tales
[box: 7]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 12-minute color production Three Mountain Tales, a 1982 release directed by Roadside Theater. Originally produced as a filmstrip and later made into a video release, this production presents mountain folk tales as interpreted by Appalshop's Roadside Theater, and illustrated with pastel drawings by taleteller Angelyn DeBord. The tales are told in mountain dialect and are accompanied by fiddle, banjo, and guitar. Stories include: "Fat and Lean", a ghost story with a comic twist; "Little Fish Story" a tale from the Smoky Mountains about friendship and the origin of rainbows; and "The Big Toe", the story of a boy's encounter with a goblin whose toe looked too much like a potato. Subjects include mountain life, folklore and folk tales of the Appalachian region.

Health
175 videotapes
Scope and Content Note:

This series contains Appalshop films that focus on rural health care, rural clinics, and coal mining-related illnesses in the Appalachian region. Contents include: masters of finished films; unused original video and audio material recorded during production (outtakes); untitled masters; and video dubs. Media formats include: audio cassette; and 1" open reel, 3/4" U-matic, Hi-8, D2, and Betacam SP videotape.

A more detailed inventory of moving image elements for each film is available. Please contact the Appalshop Archive for further information.

Belinda
[box: 1]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains materials related to the 29-minute color documentary Belinda, a 1992 release directed by Anne Lewis. The film profiles Belinda Mason, a newspaper journalist and native of eastern Kentucky who became infected with the HIV virus in 1987. The film describes how Mason went public with her illness and spent the remaining years of her life advocating for AIDS prevention, education, treatment, and human rights. Mason is interviewed about her experiences dealing with AIDS, the support she found within her rural community, and her role and responsibilities as a national spokesperson for people with AIDS. Included is a presentation by Mason to members of the Southern Baptist Convention. Subjects include Appalachian women, rural health issues, and education for women infected with HIV in the Appalachian region.

Fighting for a Breath
[box: 2]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 27-minute color documentary Fighting for a Breath, a 1995 release directed by Stephanie Wagner Whetstone. The film examines pneumoconiosis, commonly know as black lung, a debilitating and often fatal lung disease caused by excessive exposure to coal dust. Explores the role of coal mining in causing black lung disease and the obstacles encountered by current victims of the disease in obtaining black lung benefits. Looks at the movement in the late 1960s, organized by Appalachian coal miners, their families, and a few doctors and politicians, to create a legal definition of black lung disease and gain compensation for its victims. Interviews include disabled miners seeking compensation, attorneys, historians, doctors and activists. Subjects include coal mining history, black lung, coal dust diseases, and rural health issues in the Appalachian region.

Frontier Nursing Service
[box: 3]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 28-minute color documentary Frontier Nursing Service, a 1984 release directed by Anne Lewis. The film documents the visit of Mary Marvin Breckenridge Patterson to Appalshop for a screening of "The Forgotten Frontier," a silent film she made in 1929 about the Frontier Nursing Service, a nurse-midwife organization established by Mary Breckenridge in Perry County, Kentucky in 1925. Breckenridge's 1925 film shows nurse-midwives riding on horseback through woods to deliver babies, treat gunshot victims, and innoculate schoolchildren. The documentary recounts the history of the service, the growth of the service into a hospital with a nurse-midwife training program. Present at the screening is Betty Lester, the thirteenth nurse-midwife to work with the Service, who is interviewed about her experiences. Subjects include Appalachian women, Kentucky history, midwives and midwifery, and rural health in the Appalachian region.

Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise
[box: 4]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 22-minute color documentary Healthy, Wealthy and Wise, a 1997 release directed by Mimi Pickering. The documentary looks at health care in rural America and how it has been affected by the managed care system, the difficulty of recruiting and retaining health professionals in rural areas, and the outmigration of patients to large urban centers. Subjects include rural health services and needs in the Appalachian region, the effect of managed care on rural health services, and rural-urban migration.

Mud Creek Clinic
[box: 5]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 29-minute color documentary Mud Creek Clinic, a 1986 release directed by Anne Lewis 1986. The film examines the Mud Creek Clinic, a primary health clinic that was founded in 1973 by a community in Floyd County, Kentucky. Through interviews with patients and the community it looks at the formation of the clinic in 1973. The film also interviews clinic founder, director and activist Eula Hall about her work in gaining a clinic for the community, creating school lunch programs, and walking UMWA picket lines in Harlan County. Subjects include rural clinics, rural health services, community activism, social conditions in Kentucky, and women of the Appalachian region.

Labor
13 film containers; 1 container of soundtrack; 4 audio reels; 125 videotapes; 19 audio cassettes
Scope and Content Note:

This series contains Appalshop films that focus on the activities of the United Mine Workers of America, labor history, labor strikes, and the views of management, labor leaders and rank and file union members. Contents include: masters of finished films; unused original film, video and audio material recorded during production (outtakes); workprint, audio mix, and pre-print film elements; preservation elements; projection film prints; untitled masters; and video dubs. Media formats include: 16mm film; 16mm magnetic track; 1/4" audio reel; audio cassette; and 1" open reel, 3/4" U-matic, D2, and Betacam SP videotape.

A more detailed inventory of moving image elements for each film is available. Please contact the Appalshop Archive for further information.

Justice in the Coalfields
[box: 1]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 57-minute color documentary Justice In The Coalfields, a 1995 release directed by Anne Lewis. The documentary follows the United Mine Workers strike against the Pittston Coal Company and explores the strike's social, cultural, and economic impact on coalfield communities. Footage includes state troopers escorting replacement workers through the picket lines and the civil disobedience of striking union members. Interviews include rank and file union members, a federal judge, a public interest lawyer, the coal company president, and the public affairs director of the National Right to Work Committee. Subjects include coal miners, labor disputes, labor strikes and lockouts, and economic conditions in coalfield communities.

Mine War on Blackberry Creek
[box: 2]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 29-minute color documentary Mine War on Blackberry Creek , a 1986 release directed by Anne Lewis. The film is a series of documentary vignettes on the United Mine Workers of America strike against the A.T. Massey Coal Company. Includes footage of replacement workers entering the mines with security men past picketing miners. In interviews miners discuss the history of labor struggles in the region and their determination to continue striking. Also interviewed are A.T. Massey CEO Don Blankenship, who discusses his views on capitalism, social Darwinism, and the global economy, and Richard Trumka--then-candidate for President of the AFL-CIO--who describes union values. Subjects include coal mining strikes and lockouts in Kentucky, and labor disputes.

Roving Pickets
[box: 3]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 28-minutes color documentary Roving Pickets, a 1991 release directed by Anne Lewis. The documentary looks at the post-1950s coal industry in Eastern Kentucky and how mechanization in the auto, steel and energy industries led small coal operators to nullify union contracts in order to reduce costs. The consequences of these changes on rural communities are examined in interviews with miners, coal operators and other participants who discuss reduced wages, unemployment, out-migration, and, in 1961 and 1962, the cancellation of union health insurance benefits and the threatened closing of the UMWA hospitals. Subjects include the United Mine Workers Union, coal miners, the coal trade, rural conditions, economic conditions and the mining trade in southeastern Kentucky.

United Mine Workers of America 1970: A House Divided
[box: 4]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 14-minute black and white documentary United Mine Workers Union 1970: A House Divided, a 1971 release directed by Ben Zickafoose and Dan Mohn. The film intercuts a 1970 speech given by Tony Boyle, then-president of the United Mine Workers of America, at a miners' rally in Big Stone Gap, Virginia with scenes at a mine and interviews with working and disabled miners. The film contrasts Boyle's statements with those of the rank and file members commenting on the reform movement then growing within the union. Subjects include Tony Boyle, labor union members, and coal miners.

Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts
108 film containers; 2 containers of soundtrack; 136 audio reels; 104 videotapes; 6 audio cassettes
Scope and Content Note:

This series contains Appalshop that feature writers, visual artists and performing artists who are based in the Appalachian region and whose works reflect the experiences of Appalachians. Also included are documentations of collaborative projects between Appalachian-based performers and performing artists from other regions of the United States. Contents include: masters of finished films; unused original film, video and audio material recorded during production (outtakes); audition tapes; rehearsal tapes; dailies; workprint, audio mix, and pre-print film elements; projection film prints; untitled masters; untitled masters, video version of filmstrip; and video dubs. Media formats include: 16mm film; 16mm magnetic track; 1/4" audio reel; audio cassette; DAT; and 1" open reel, 3/4" U-matic, Betamax. and Betacam SP videotape.

A more detailed inventory of moving image elements for each film is available. Please contact the Appalshop Archive for further information.

Fat Monroe
[box: 1]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 28-minute color narrative film Fat Monroe, a 1991 release directed by Andrew Garrison. The fiction film is based on the short story of the same name by Appalachian author Gurney Norman. Ned Beatty plays the title role of Fat Monroe, who offers a ride in his pick up truck to nine year old Wilgus Collier (played by William Johnson). The story unfolds as a battle of wits between the overwhelming Monroe, who seems to twist everything the boy says, and the steadfast Wilgus, who stands up to Monroe's devilment. By the end of his ride, Wilgus's notion of truth and trust in the adult world is changed forever. Subjects include rural youth, mountain life in literature, and fiction of the Appalachian region.

Harriet Simpson Arnow: 1908-1986
[box: 2]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 35-minute color documentary Harriet Simpson Arnow: 1908 - 1986, a 1988 release directed by Herb e. Smith. The film profiles writer Simpson Arnow and includes interviews filmed not long before her death. In interviews Arnow describes the basic biographical details of her life and discusses her experience teaching in a one-room schoolhouse in her native Pulaski County, Kentucky; how she left the mountains looking for work and an opportunity to write; and of the difficulties of finding the time and energy to write while raising a family on an Appalachian farm and later in wartime Detroit. Subjects include Appalachian women, social life and customs, economic conditions, and literature of the Appalachian region.

Open Windows
[box: 3]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 28-minute color documentary Open Windows, a 1991 release directed by Anne Lewis. The film documents the American Festival Project, a multi-community event that was held in eastern Kentucky and southwest Virginia in 1988. The film includes performances by Junebug Productions, Urban Bush Women, Roadside Theater, Earl Gilmore, Liz Lerman and the Dance Exchange, A Traveling Jewish Theater, and Francisco Gonzalez. Subjects include theater, dance and social aspects of the performing arts.

Ourselves and the Promise
[box: 4]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 27-minute color documentary Ourselves and That Promise, a 1978 release directed by Joe Gray with Gene DuBey and Scott Faulkner. In this film four contemporary Kentucky-based artists--James Still, Robert Penn Warren, Ronnie Criswell, and Billy Davis-discuss the history and geography that molded their work. It records the works themselves (poems, photographs, and drawings ) and the artists' remarks about their pieces. Subjects include literature, artists and art of the Appalachian region and Kentucky.

Red Fox: Second Hangin'
[box: 5]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 90-minute color recording Red Fox/Second Hangin', a 1984 release directed by Don Baker. This video version of a play produced by Appalshop's Roadside Theater recounts the story of the first two executions in Wise County, Virginia. In folk tale style, actors dramatize the events that led to the implication and execution of two men for murders that resulted from a feud that began during the Civil War. The live peformance is accompanied by projections of historic photographs and a film sequence created especially for the video release. Subjects include capital punishment in Virginia, Wise County (Va.) history, Marshall Benton Taylor, and the Pound Mountain Massacre.

Tell Me A Story, Sing Me A Song
[box: 6]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 29-minute color documentary Tell Me A Story, Sing Me A Song, a 1985 release directed by Dudley Cocke, Anne Lewis, and Susan Wehling. The documentary showcases the work of three theater companies: Junebug Productions, A Traveling Jewish Theatre, and Appalshop's Roadside Theater. The three groups performed together in the mid 1980s to explore cultural pluralism and to bring theater from diverse cultural traditions to underserved audiences. Subjects include the social aspects of theater, and rural theater and performance.

Media and Cultural Identity
115 film containers; 184 audio reels; 410 videotapes; 8 audio cassettes
Scope and Content Note:

This series contains Appalshop films that focus on representations of Appalachian people and culture in mass media, and media makers who are based in the Appalachian region. Contents include: masters of finished films; unused original film, video and audio material recorded during production (outtakes); workprint, audio mix, and pre-print film elements; preservation elements; projection film prints; untitled masters; and video dubs. Media formats include: 16mm film; 16mm magnetic track; 1/4" audio reel; audio cassette; and 1" open reel, 3/4" U-matic, Betacam SP, Digital Betacam, and DV Cam videotape.

A more detailed inventory of moving image elements for each film is available. Please contact the Appalshop Archive for further information.

The Appalshop Show
[box: 1]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains materials related to the 90-minute documentary The Appalshop Show, a 1977 release by Appalshop. The film is a self-portrait of Appalshop, an independent media center located in central Appalachia. Excerpts from 12 Appalshop films are included along with interviews with members of the organization. Subjects include Appalshop Film & Video, nonprofit organizations, and documentary films.

Mountain Vision
[box: 2]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 28-minute color documentary Mountain Vision, a 1991 release directed by Susan Wehling. The film examines five examples of Appalachian community television: Joe's Show produced by Joe Engle, The Renfro Valley Show produced by John Lair, Virgil Q. Wacks Varieties, East Tennessee's Broadside Television, and Appalshop's Headwaters. Subjects include community television and mountain life.

Stranger With a Camera
[box: 3]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 61-minute color documentary Stranger With a Camera, a 2000 release directed by Elizabeth Barret. The film explores the 1967 shooting in Letcher County, KY of Canadian filmmaker Hugh O'Connor by local landlord Hobart Ison. The circumstances of the shooting are examined in the context of documentary media representation of central Appalachia in the late1960s. The film recounts the events leading up to and following the murder, and the community's reaction. The film's director, a native of Hazard, Kentucky, offers first-person narration and reflects on the relationship between media-makers and the communities they portray in their work. Also included are descriptions of media portrayals of the region and the founding of the Appalachian Film Workshop (Appalshop). Includes interviews with witnesses, community residents, Tom Gish and Pat Gish (editors of the Mountain Eagle, a local newspaper), and Hugh O'Connor's daughter. Subjects include documentary film, social conditions, economic conditions, rural crimes, and media representations of the Appalachian region.

Strangers and Kin
[box: 4]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 58-minute color documentary Strangers and Kin, a 1984 release directed by Herb E. Smith. The film traces the evolution of the "hillbilly" image through Hollywood films, network news and entertainment shows, and dramatic renderings of popular literature. In interviews contemporary Appalachians comment on how stereotypes are created, reinforced, and sometimes used to rationalize exploitation. Subjects include Appalachian stereotypes in mass media and social conditions in the Appalachian region.

Music
174 film containers; 11 containers of soundtrack; 234 audio reels; 520 videotapes; 12 audio cassettes; 32 digital audio tapes
Scope and Content Note:

This series contains Appalshop films that document vocal and instrumental musical traditions of the Appalachian region and profile Appalachian musicians, singers and songwriters. Contents include: masters of finished films; unused original film, video and audio material recorded during production (outtakes); workprint, audio mix, and pre-print film elements; preservation elements; projection film prints; untitled masters; and video dubs. Media formats include: 16mm film; 16mm magnetic track; 1/4" audio reel; audio cassette; DAT, ADAT and CD audio; and 1" open reel, 3/4" U-matic, VHS, Hi-8, Betacam SP, Digital Betacam, and DV Cam videotape.

A more detailed inventory of moving image elements for each film is available. Please contact the Appalshop Archive for further information.

Artus Moser of Buckeye Cove
[box: 1]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains materials related to the 29-minute color documentary Artus Moser of Buckeye Cove , a 1985 release directed by Anne Lewis. The film profiles Moser, who was born in 1894 and grew up on the Biltmore Estate near Asheville, North Carolina. In interviews he discusses his life as an artist and early collector of ballads for the Library of Congress, college and high school professor, singer, storyteller, actor, painter, sculptor, gardener, and naturalist. Subjects include artists, American ballads, and folk songs of the Appalachian region.

Dreadful Memories: The Life of Sarah Ogan Gunning
[box: 2]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 38-minute color documentary Dreadful Memories: The Life of Sarah Ogan Gunning, a 1988 release directed by Mimi Pickering. The film is a portrait of balladeer Gunning who was born in eastern Kentucky in 1910. Gunning is interviewed about the organizing drives and coal mine strikes of the 1920s and '30s and the poverty of the Depression. Gunning's a cappella roots music and labor organizing songs are intercut with interview and archival footage. Subjects include coal mining, Kentucky ballads, the Depression in the Appalachian region, and labor organizing.

Hazel Dickens: It's Hard to Tell the Singer From the Song
[box: 3]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 60-minute color documentary Hazel Dickens: It's Hard to Tell the Singer from the Song, a 2001 release directed by Mimi Pickering. The film profiles the West Virginia bluegrass singer and songwriter Hazel Dickens. It includes interviews with Dickens and fellow musicians Alison Krauss, Naomi Judd and Dudley Connell. Dickens discusses the conflicts she encounters as a woman in a traditionally male milieu, feelings of physical and cultural displacement, and her working class childhood in Appalachia. Includes performances of 16 of her songs including "Mama's Hand," " Working Girl Blues," and "Black Lung." Subjects include Appalachian women, bluegrass music, and social and economic conditions in West Virginia and the Appalachian region.

John Jacob Niles
[box: 4]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 32-minute color documentary John Jacob Niles, a 1978 release directed by Bill Richardson with Mimi Pickering and Ben Zickafoose. The film is a biography of the life and work of 85-year-old folk ballad singer John Jacob Niles, who played a role in the national "discovery" of Appalachian folk music and the music's revival. In interviews he describes how, during the 1920s and '30s, he and photographer Doris Ulmann travelled mountain regions, taking pictures of people and learning their songs. The film shows Niles in concert, at home, at work arranging his music, and explaining the historical place of balladry in American music. Subjects include ballads and folk music of the Appalachian region

Lee Sexton's Whoa Mule
[box: 5]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 3-minute color music video Lee Sexton: Whoa Mule, a 1989 release directed by Herb E. Smith. This 3-minute music video for the song "Whoa Mule" features alternating scenes of old time banjo-player Sexton behind a mule-drawn plow, tending to his three-acre garden in rural Linefork, Kentucky, and a performance of the Lee Sexton Band at a square dance at the Blackey Senior Citizens Center in Blackey, Kentucky. Subjects include square dance music and banjo music of the Appalachian region.

Lily May Ledford
[box: 6]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 29-minute color documentaryLily May Ledford, a 1988 release directed by Anne Lewis. The film is a portrait of banjo player and National Heritage Fellowship Award-recipient Ledford, who led the Coon Creek Girls, the first all-woman string band to be played on the radio. The band played their own instruments and expanded the repertoire of what was considered acceptable material for women at the time. Includes interviews with Ledford about growing up in Red River Gorge in Kentucky, how her style developed, and her experiences breaking into show business. Also included are interviews with scholars and musician friends on the conflict between personal and professional fulfillment that existed throughout her career, her struggle for autonomy in the music business, and the role she played in the "commercialization" of mountain folk culture. Subjects include Appalachian women, women musicians, folk music, fiddle music and banjo music of the Appalachian region.

Morgan Sexton: Banjo Player from Bull Creek
[box: 7]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 28-minute color documentary Morgan Sexton: Banjo Player from Bull Creek, a 1991 release directed by Anne Lewis. The film profiles 80-year-old banjo player and National Heritage Fellowship Award-recipient Sexton. In interviews he recounts his life and how a series of family tragedies required him to work while still a boy. He describes gathering crops, logging timber, cutting railroad ties, and later working in the coal mines. Sexton and his nephew, banjo player Lee Sexton, chat about learning music from their elders and each other, and the old days when, after a hard day's work, they would "roll up the rug" to play music and dance with the neighbors. Intercut with these stories are Sexton's renditions of songs including "Little Birdie," "Wagner's Lad," "Bonnie Blue Eyes," "London City Where I Did Dwell," and "Beautiful Doll." Subjects include banjo music, rural conditions, and social conditions of the Appalachian region.

Music Fair
[box: 8]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 19-minute color documentary Music Fair, which was released in 1972 and directed by Appalachian Film Workshop. The film documents the first Appalachian Peoples Music Fair in High Knob, Virginia. Five musical numbers are performed in styles that include folk, jug band, and bluegrass. Includes footage of fair attendees. Subjects include public events, folk music, jug band music and bluegrass music in the Appalachian region.

The Ralph Stanley Story
[box: 9]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 82-minute color documentary The Ralph Stanley Story, a 2000 release directed by Herb E. Smith. The film profiles bluegrass legend and National Heritage Fellowship Award-recipient Stanley. Through interviews and footage it explores Stanley's musical roots in the Clinch Mountains of Virginia, the early days of The Stanley Brothers, and Stanley's decision to continue performing after the untimely death of his brother Carter. Includes interviews with Stanley, former band members, and other musicians such as Patty Loveless and Dwight Yoakum. Includes performances of songs including "Rank Stranger," "Pretty Polly," and "Man of Constant Sorrow," and performances with Larry Sparks and Ricky Skaggs at his annual "Hills of Home Bluegrass Festival." Subjects include Carter Stanley, bluegrass music, and banjo music of the Appalachian region.

Sourwood Mountain Dulcimers
[box: 10]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 28-minute color documentary Sourwood Moutain Dulcimers, a 1976 release directed by Gene DuBey. The film features I.D. Stamper, a master dulcimer builder and player from eastern Kentucky, and John McCutcheon, a young musician, as they play together, exchange tunes, and discuss musical traditions and demonstrate the difference between hammered and mountain style dulcimer. The film includes footage of Stamper building a dulcimer and discussing the traditions he learned as a young boy from family members and neighbors. Subjects include mountain life, the Appalachian dulcimer, dulcimer construction and dulcimer players.

The Sunny Side of Life
[box: 11]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 58-minute color documentary Sunny Side of Life, a 1985 release directed by Scott Faulkner, Anthony Slone, and Jack Wright. The film focuses on the Carter Fold, an old time music hall in Hiltons, Virginia founded by the children of A.P. and Sara Carter (of The Carter Family). In interviews Janette Carter, Joe Carter, and Dale Jett articulate their dedication to showcasing the music of southwestern Virginia, and how old-time music is integrated into the life of the community. Includes footage of performances at the Carter Fold by old time musicians including Janette and Joe Carter, the Home Folks, and Red Clay Ramblers. Also includes footage of audience members spontaneously dancing and reacting to the performances. Subjects include women country musicians, country music of the Appalachian region, old time music, and the Carter Family.

The Wild World of Hasil Adkins
[box: 12]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 29-minute color documentary The Wild World of Hasil Adkins, a 1993 release directed by Julien Nitzburg. The documentary profiles Adkins, a 56-year-old rockabilly musician and singer from Boone County, West Virginia. Adkins is considered an early practitioner of "psychobilly", a genre that mixes punk, rockabilly and other styles. The film presents Adkins music and documents his personal exploits. Includes interviews with Adkins, his family, friends and various law enforcement agents. Subjects include rockabilly music, rock musicians from the Appalachian region.

Politics and Government
130 film containers; 129 audio reels; 130 videotapes
Scope and Content Note:

This series contains Appalshop films that focus on local politics, national political issues on a local level, and political figures from the Appalachian region. Contents include: masters of finished films; unused original film, video and audio material recorded during production (outtakes); workprint, audio mix, and pre-print film elements; projection film prints; untitled masters; and video dubs. Media formats include: 16mm film; 16mm magnetic track; 1/4" audio reel; audio cassette; and 1" open reel, 3/4" U-matic, VHS, and Betacam SP videotape.

A more detailed inventory of moving image elements for each film is available. Please contact the Appalshop Archive for further information.

The Big Lever: Party Politics in Leslie County, Kentucky
[box: 1]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains materials related to the 53-minute color documentary The Big Lever: Party Politics in Leslie County, Kentucky , a 1982 release directed by Frances Morton. The film explores the machinations of party politics in rural Leslie County, Kentucky. It documents local candidates' hollow to hollow vote-hunting; family arguments over candidates; patronage promises; speech-making on courthouse steps; and the up-and- down career of the incumbent County Judge-Executive George Wooten, who sought re-election while under indictment for vote fraud conspiracy. Richard Nixon chose Leslie County for his first public appearance after resigning the presidency, and the film includes footage of this visit. Subjects include politics and government in the Appalachian region, public opinion and social life and customs.

Peace Stories
[box: 2]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 28-minute color documentary Peace Stories, a 1991 release directed by Anne Lewis. The film features three men from the South recounting their war experiences and how their views of war were affected by participation. Interviewed are: William Farmer, who served in an armoured tank battalion in France in World War I; Connie Bolling, who was recruited by the Department of Defense during World War II to train cyclotron operators in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the enriched uranium used in the first atomic bomb was made in secrecy; and Jack Wright, a Vietnam veteran who describes an experience where he felt he was responsible for killing a prisoner of war, and how difficult it has been for him to recover. Subjects include the personal narratives of Veterans from the Appalachian region and psychological aspects of war.

Tribute to Carl D. Perkins
[box: 3]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 29-minute color documentary Tribute to Carl D. Perkins, a 1986 release directed by Anne Lewis and Dee Davis. The film documents a memorial to U.S. Congressman Carl D. Perkins in his hometown of Hindman, Kentucky. The memorial is attended by 100 members of Congress and 3000 Kentuckians. The film recounts Perkins' legislative achievements and home-style approach in relating to his constituency. Subjects include United States legislators, Kentucky politics and government.

War, Taxes, and the Almighty Dollar
[box: 4]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 30-minute color documentary War, Taxes, and The Almighty Dollar, a 1988 release directed by Joe Gray Jr. The documentary looks at the effects of defense spending on the U.S. budget deficit, trade deficit, inflation, factory closings, the farm crisis, local tax increases, citizen tax revolts, and the urban housing crisis. Subjects include the moral and ethical aspects of war financing.

Religious Life and Customs
30 film containers; 52 audio reels; 82 videotapes
Scope and Content Note:

This series contains Appalshop films that focus on religious customs, music, and the social role of religion in the Appalachian region. Contents include: masters of finished films; unused original film, video and audio material recorded during production (outtakes); workprint, audio mix, and pre-print film elements; preservation elements; projection film prints; and video dubs. Media formats include: 16mm film; 16mm magnetic track; 1/4" audio reel; audio cassette; and 1" open reel, 3/4" U-matic, and VHS videotape.

A more detailed inventory of moving image elements for each film is available. Please contact the Appalshop Archive for further information.

In the Good Old Fashioned Way
[box: 1]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the color documentary In the Good Old Fashioned Way, a 1973 release directed by Herb e. Smith. The film documents the leadership and members of an Old Regular Baptist Church in the Appalachian region. Through interviews and footage it examines how church leadership struggles to maintain the congregation while facing diminishing membership and lack of interest from young adults. Footage includes a riverside baptism, foot washing ceremonies, an Association Meeting, the "lined-out" music of the church, and Memorial Services held at a family cemetery. Subjects include religious life and customs and hymns of the Appalachian region.

Rural Life and Social Conditions
122 film containers; 4 containers of soundtrack; 128 audio reels; 212 videotapes
Scope and Content Note:

This series contains Appalshop films that focus on lifestyles, living conditions, and economic and municipal issues specific to rural communities in the Appalachian region. Contents include: masters of finished films; unused original film, video and audio material recorded during production (outtakes); workprint, audio mix, and pre-print film elements; preservation elements; projection film prints; untitled masters; and video dubs. Media formats include: 16mm film; 16mm magnetic track; 1/4" audio reel; audio cassette; and 1" open reel, 3/4" U-matic, VHS, Betacam SP and Digital Betacam videotape.

A more detailed inventory of moving image elements for each film is available. Please contact the Appalshop Archive for further information.

Fast Food Women
[box: 1]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the color documentary Fast Food Women, a 1991 release directed by Anne Lewis. The film looks at the lives of women who work at four fast food restaurants in eastern Kentucky. The primarily middle-aged women are interviewed about the difficulties of working and raising children while being the sole income source for their families, working at near-minimum wage, difficulties in getting full-time hours because of scheduling policies, and lack of health care and other benefits. An interview with author Barbara Garson (The Electronic Sweatshop) is intercut with comments from human resources managers at the Druther's chain. Subjects include social conditions of Appalachian women and women food service employees.

Lee Banks: Mountain Farmer
[box: 2]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 9-minute black and white documentary Lee Banks: Mountain Farmer, a 1973 release directed by Shelby Adams and Mimi Pickering. The film is a snapshot portrait of Lee Banks, a traditional mountain farmer. He is interviewed about his life as a farmer and is shown at work in his field with his horse and a wooden plow. Subjects include subsistence farming and rural conditions in the Appalachian region.

Long Journey Home
[box: 3]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 58-minute color documentary Long Journey Home, a 1987 release directed by Elizabeth Barret. The film explores the ethnic diversity of the Appalachian region, the economic forces which cause people to migrate into and out of the area, and the personal decisions individuals make to stay, leave, and return. It includes interviews with various people from the region about their choices. Subjects include rural-urban migration, Appalachian African Americans, and social conditions of the Appalachian region.

Rough Side of the Mountain
[box: 4]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 56-minute color documentary Rough Side of The Mountain , a 1997 release directed by Anne Lewis. The documentary explores the closings of mining companies and factories in two company towns in southwest Virginia, Trammel and Ivanhoe. The film documents the organizing efforts of local residents in Trammel to purchase auctioned homes, and the efforts of the Ivanhoe Civic League to rebuild after the loss of two major industries, the school, and local businesses. Residents are interviewd about their efforts to rebuild their communities. Subjects include mining corporations, company towns, community activism, and community life in the Appalachian region.

Shelter
[box: 5]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 57-minute color documentary Shelter, a 2001 release directed by Anne Lewis. Shelter tells the stories of 5 rural West Virginia women who live in shelters for battered women and attempt to find safer conditions for themselves and their children. Subjects include services for abused women in West Virginia, and social and economic conditions of women in West Virginia and the Appalachian region.

The Struggle of Coon Branch Mountain
[box: 6]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 13-minute color documentary The Struggle of Coon Branch Mountain, a 1972 release directed by Mimi Pickering. The film documents the efforts of a small West Virginia community to improve the roads and school opportunities in their area. Local parents are interviewed about the lack of resources in their community and are shown meeting, organizing and, in a series of still photographs, marching on the governor's office in Charleston, West Virginia.  Subjects include rural conditions, schools, and community activism.

Whippin' the Devil
[box: 7]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 27-minute color documentary Whippin the Devil, a 2005 release directed by Anthony Slone. The film profiles Guy Roberts, a southwestern Virginia native, who during the 1930s trafficked moonshine between Virginia and Kentucky. The film includes interviews with Roberts about his days as a boy in Pound, Virginia, bootlegging, and the years he spent fleeing law enforcement officials after taking part in a robbery. Subjects include illicit distilling (moonshining), rural conditions, and prohibition in Virginia and Kentucky.

Social Life and Customs
110 film containers; 79 audio reels; 235 videotapes
Scope and Content Note:

This series contains Appalshop films that focus on sports, pastimes, social practices, public opinion, and vocations of individuals and groups in the Appalachian region. Contents include: masters of finished films; unused original film, video and audio material recorded during production (outtakes); workprint, audio mix, and pre-print film elements; preservation elements; projection film prints; and video dubs. Media formats include: 16mm film; 16mm magnetic track; 1/4" audio reel; audio cassette; and 1" open reel, 3/4" U-matic, VHS, Betacam SP and Digital Betacam videotape.

A more detailed inventory of moving image elements for each film is available. Please contact the Appalshop Archive for further information.

Feathered Warrior
[box: 1]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 12-minute color documentary Feathered Warrior, a 1973 release directed by Ben Zickafoose, Gene DuBey and Bill Hatton. The film documents the sport of cockfighting. Through footage and interviews a seasoned cock breeder and fighter outlines the rules of the game, describes the breeding techniques and fighting skills needed to win, and explains why people enjoy the sport. Includes footage of an outdoor cockfight. Subjects include cockfighting and social life and customs.

George Wooten: Leslie County Judge
[box: 3]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 10-minute black and white documentary George Wooten: Leslie County Judge, a 1971 release directed by Herb e. Smith. The film documents a 4th of July contest at the Middle Fork of the Kentucky River in which dogs are timed for their speed in pulling a raccoon off a log and into the water. The contest serves as context for Leslie County, Kentucky Judge George Wooten to discuss the recreational pastimes of mountain life, his personal retirement, tourism, and moonshine. This film's alternate title is "Judge Wooten and Coon-on-a-Log". Subjects include social life and customs in the Appalachian region.

Girls' Hoops
[box: 2]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 27-minute color documentary Girls' Hoops, a 1998 release directed by Justine Richardson. The film explores the history of girls high school basketball in Kentucky from the 1920's, through a 40-year statewide ban, to its reemergence in the mid-70's after the passage of Title IX. Filmed over the course of a basketball season, the program features practices, games, half-time talks, championship performances and fans from small coal mining communities. Interviews include players, coaches, and a 94-year old player from a 1920s championship team. Also includes selected archival footage from state championship games. Subjects include basketball for girls and high school basketball in Kentucky.

One-Ring Circus
[box: 4]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 29-minute color documentary One Ring Circus, a 1987 release directed by Andrew Garrison. The film focuses on the small traditional circus troupe "Jules and Beck Circus." Includes interviews with the circus owner, concessioners, and performers about their work, colleagues, and life in a one-ring circus. Also included are scenes of the big top being raised and the circus performance. Subjects include amateur circus and social life and customs of the Appalachian region.

Ramsey Trade Fair
[box: 5]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 18-minute color documentary Ramsey Trade Fair, a 1973 release directed by Scott Faulkner. The film documents a weekly trade fair day in the coalfield community of Ramsey, Virginia. Local residents and merchants are shown interacting, selling, swapping goods, and passing the time. The trade fair is used as a point of departure for a consideration of rural living and the lost art of barter. Subjects include flea markets, social life and customs, and rural life.

Tomorrow's People
[box: 6]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 17-minute color documentary Tomorrow's People, a 1973 release directed by Gene DuBey. The film is a musical and visual essay on Appalachian culture and social life, featuring scenes of farming, rural life, square dancing and a banjo/fiddle/guitar trio. It includes footage of Lee Sexton leading a square dance at the Carcassonne Community Center. Subjects include social life and customs, old-time music, banjo music.

Tradition
[box: 7]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 20-minute color documentary Tradition, a 1973 release directed by Bill Hatton and Anthony Slone. The film explores the traditional mountain practice of whiskey-making known as "moonshining". An ex-miner who operates an illegal distillery is interviewed about his work, thoughts on the economic conditions and traditional forces that led him to practice the trade, and why he continues despite having gone to jail in the past for the practice. Also interviewed is a federal revenue agent on the history of moonshining and the methods used by law enforcement to locate distilleries. Includes archival photographs and footage of a still and description of its operation. Subjects include illicit distilling, law and legislation, economic conditions, and rural conditions.

Whitesburg Epic
[box: 8]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 8-minute black and white documentary Whitesburg Epic, a 1971 release directed by members of the Appalachian Film Workshop. The film uses "man on the street" reportage to interview people in the Appalachian town of Whitesburg, Kentucky on diverse local and national topics including life in a rural town, the Vietnam War, and the Kent State massacres.  Subjects include social conditions in Central Appalachia, United States public opinion, and rural youth.

Woodrow Cornett: Letcher County Butcher
[box: 9]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 10-minute black and white documentary Woodrow Cornett: Letcher County Butcher, a 1971 release directed by Bill Richardson with Frank Majority. The film documents a traditional mountain butcher in the process of butchering a hog beginning with the slaughter, then skinning and butchering the meat, and finally loading the meat on a truck. The footage is accompanied by commentary by Cornett's son-in-law Frank Majority, and harmonica music by Ashland Fouts. Subjects include butchers and social life and customs in the Appalachian region.

Youth
45 film containers; 9 audio reels; 7 videotapes
Scope and Content Note:

This series contains Appalshop films and materials produced during the making of films that examine issues particular to young adults in the Appalachian region including the coal economy, economic determinism and out-migration. Contents include: masters of finished films; unused original film, video and audio material recorded during production (outtakes); workprint, audio mix, and pre-print film elements; preservation elements; projection film prints; and video dubs. Media formats include: 16mm film; 16mm magnetic track; 1/4" audio reel; audio cassette; and 3/4" U-matic, Betacam SP and Digital Betacam videotape.

A more detailed inventory of moving image elements for each film is available. Please contact the Appalshop Archive for further information.

Appalachian Genesis
[box: 1]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains materials related to the 29-minute color documentary Appalachian Genesis, a 1973 release directed by Bill Richardson, David Adams and Ben Zickafoose. The film contains interviews with Appalachian youth about the local coal mining industry, educational system, lack of job opportunities and health care, politics and poverty. Subjects include economic conditions, rural youth, and coal mining.

In Ya Blood
[box: 2]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 20-minute black and white narrative film In Ya Blood, a 1971 release directed by Herb E. Smith. Appalshop's first fiction film, In Ya Blood tells the story of a young man from Appalachia in the summer after his senior year in high school. Randy, the protagonist, must make the difficult decision faced by many Appalachian youth--whether to stay in the mountains or leave in search of "a better life." The film follows Randy as he talks with friends, visits a coal mine, and struggles with his alternatives of working in the mines or going off to college.   Subjects include coal mining, rural youth, and economic conditions in the Appalachian region.

Line Fork Falls and Caves
[box: 3]
Scope and Content Note:

Contains material related to the 12-minute black and white documentary Line Fork Falls and Caves, a 1971 release directed by Herb e. Smith. The film documents a group of young men as they journey deep into the caves of Line Fork in eastern Kentucky. Subjects include caving and rural youth.

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