The KDL is under construction

University of Kentucky materials are on ExploreUK. This item: Image 33 of KYIAN 1975.

Collections: 
0-9 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Image 33 of KYIAN 1975

Part of University of Kentucky Yearbook Collection

ITNJN1 summeR n rchitecture students at UK discovered why Italy was known as the "City of the En-chantement" during the summer of 74. From May through August, 17 students visited France, Germany, Switzerland and England while stationed in Venice, Italy for the purpose of studying architecture. "It's sort of a European program, though not exactly an exchange. Basically, it involves moving the school of architecture to Italy," explained Lucy VanMeter, one of the participating fifth year architecture students. The program had been geared for the summer of '74 in Italy hoping "for one thing it was cheaper," said VanMeter. The students met for a formal class once a week. They also traveled together on field trips and "spent many afternoons in cafe's discussing what we had seen," said Tom Duffy, another particpant. "We got up around 6:00 a.m. every morning and went to Open Market to buy groceries. We didn't just go to study arcitecture but to learn to adjust living in a place like Venice for a summer," said VanMeter. "Everything was different. Food, light bulbs, furniture, houses, sidewalks and mainly the language which cause hours of confusion for all of us," she continued. The group made short trips to small towns outside Venice because, as Duffy described it, "that's where the great architecture is." "We spent a lot of time sitting in the square in the middle of town just watching people. Venice was a cultural center and seaport where people came from all directions," Duffy said. VanMeter added, "We definitely learned a lot and loved every moment, even the studying." TOP LEFT: Debbie Zaborowski working on a project. TOP RIGHT: A form designed by Keith Muth. BOTTOM LEFT: A form by Keith Muth. BOTTOM RIGHT: A kite, that flew briefly, was constructed of tin foil and plywood rods and set to flight by an architecture class on a windy November day. 29

Hosted by the University of Kentucky

Contact us: kdl-help@lsv.uky.edu

Contributors: