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University of Kentucky materials are on ExploreUK. This item: Image 66 of Museum Paper, no. 4, 1921 - including "Annotated List of the Avery Bird Collection in The Alabama Museum of Natural History" by Ernest G. Holt and "Biographical Sketch of Dr. William Cushman Avery" by Miss Mary E. Avery.

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Image 66 of Museum Paper, no. 4, 1921 - including "Annotated List of the Avery Bird Collection in The Alabama Museum of Natural History" by Ernest G. Holt and "Biographical Sketch of Dr. William Cushman Avery" by Miss Mary E. Avery

Part of Alabama Works Progress Administration Publications

5 Y l ' l I l V 62 GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF ALABAMA i V AV 92. PHLCEOTOMUS PILEATUS PILEATUS (Linnaeus). y fi he] PILEATED Wooopecxim. ` , g . "L0g-C0clc." . out it A _ "Not common, though once abundant. Found in heavily l I I timbered localities; chiefly in the river bottom." (1890e). Ou? I 4._,d Writing of Baldwin County, Sept. 16-Oct. 2, 1892, the V Wh A * ;. Doctor noted: "Pileated woodpecker not common; one ; hea specimen was taken at Ramblers Rest on Perdido Bay." i y Wa V A . No. 1004. Male. Baldwin Co. Oct. 2, 1892. W. C. Avery. lt tyy A No. 1063. Female. Greensboro. Sept. 8, 1893. W. C. Avery. E ( . 93. MELANERPES ERYTHROCEPHALUS (Linnaeus). We I - RED-HEADED VVOODPECKER. "` Wh A yr] _ "Slzirt-Tccil." A . A After cataloging an adult male taken at Greensboro, ; _ A June 9, 1876, as No. 14 of his first series, Dr. Avery m . . writes: V D?] V_ A , "Stoniach contained debris of insects, and blackberry A tw . seeds. . gg "When I was a boy the red-headed woodpecker was a { C1., J V very common bird. Thousands of these harmless birds __ V . have been destroyed, under the pretext of saving the 4,; tm 1V fruit and the Indian corn. I believe that when they I ev V A . peck into the latter it is to search for a worm that de- is stroys the corn: be that as it may the redheaded wood- Of pecker does more good by the destruction of insects than A D( _ harm by eating a little fruit or corn even. an - .=- "No bird affords a better mark for wanton shooters A OU E, than this beautiful bird. Thousands perish because they , ta are a good mark for a rifle shot. V; "There used to be hundreds in Alabama where there 1 A _ is one now. When we destroy our friends, our enemies, A the cotton worms, increase until their number is legion. , Al; A "My country thou art doomed! The degraded African A l . A destroys every day with ruthless hand thy crown of trees. [ i _ I thy noble forests. Even the mockingbird does not escape Oi { * . _ the senseless, soulless negro. Not long after the war, I ` C, VV saw two negro boys with guns, both of them at least {V V seventeen or eighteen years old. I asked one of them _ ti 5 what he had in his bird-bag. He told me (I think) that pl I . l I E l I y . K ' . IV

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