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Page 220 of Zigzag journeys in the British Isles, or, Vacation rambles in historic lands / by Hezekiah Butterworth.

ZIGZAG 70(URA'E YS- IN THE BRITISH ISLES. The next day, kitty, brought him another pigeon; the next, and the next; and she regularly supplied him, and the two shared the birds together, and were as happy as they could be under such circumstances. What became of kitty We do not know; but we do know happily that Sir Henry ever after was verys fond of cats. Wherever you find his pictures, you will find a plump cat beside him. He at last saw prosperous days again, and he seems never to have forgotten his benefactor, or the race to which she belonged. INSTRUMENTS OF PUNISHMENT USED IN THE TOWER. SOMIE of the instruments of punishment and torture used by our English ancestors, which for many years have been happily abandoned, are to be seen in the Tower. Others are not to be found even there. The character of the shrew, or perpetually scolding woman, is supposed to be little known at the present day. She is thought to belong properly to old English times (perhaps she does!), and one of the best pictures of her un- amiable characteristics may be found in Shakspeare's old-fashioned comcdy of " Taming the Shrew." Petruchio, the suitor of Katharina, or the shrewv, in this old play, was sure that he could subdue and live happily with a scolding con- sort. Petruchio had had a rather rough experience in the world, and had heard some discordant sounds and loud noises, and he thus argued the point p)hilosophically:- Think you a little din can daunt my ears' Have I not in my time heard lions roar Have I not heard the sea puffed up Nvith winds Ragre like an angry boar chafecd with sweat Have I not heard great ordnance in the field, And heaven's artillery thunder in the skies Have I not in the pitched battle heard Loud 'larums, neighing steeds, and trumpets' clang And do you tell me of a woman's tongue " This would seem to indicate that the shrew was indeed a terrible woman, however xvell it argues the fitness of Petruchio to woo her. In provincial towns a mode of punishment was especially provided for shrews and scolding women. It was called the ducking-stool. It consisted of a long beam of wood balanced on a pivot over a river or pond, and so arranged that the scolding woman could be dipped into the water and lifted out again, 220

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