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Page 4 of Channings / by Mrs. Henry Wood.

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4 The Channings St. John's Gospel: " That which is born of the flesh is flesh; and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit." In the course of his sermon he pointed out that the unhappy prisoners in the gaol, awaiting the summons to answer before an earthly tribunal for the evil deeds they had committed, had been led into their present miserable condition by the seductions of the flesh. They had fallen into sin, he went on, by the indulgence of their passions; they had placed no restraint upon their animal appetites and guilty pleasures; they had sunk gradually into crime, and had now to meet the penalty of the law. But did no blame, he asked, attach to those who had remained indifferent to their down- ward course; who had never stretched forth a friendly hand to rescue them from destruction; who had made no effort to teach and guide in the ways of truth and righteousness these outcasts of society were we, he demanded, at liberty to evade our responsibility by asking in the words of earth's first criminal, " Am I my brother's keeper" No; it was at once our duty and our privilege to engage in the noble work of man's reformation-to raise the fallen, to seek out the lost, and to restore the outcast; and this, he argued, could only be accomplished by a widely-disseminated know- ledge of God's truth, by patient, self-denying labour in God's work, and by a devout dependence on God's Holy Spirit. At the conclusion of the service the head-master proceeded to the vestry, where the minor canons, choristers, and lay-clerks kept their surplices. Not the dean and chapter; they robed in the chapter-house: and the king's scholars put on their surplices in the school-room. The choristers followed Mr. Pye to the vestry, Bywater entering with them. The boys grouped themselves together: they were expecting- to use their own expression-a row. " Bywater, what is the meaning of this conduct" was the master's stern demand. " I had no surplice, sir," was Bywater's answer- a saucy-looking boy with a red face, who had a pro pensity for getting into ' rows,' and, consequently, into punishment. " No surplice !" repeated Mr. Pye-for the like

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