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Page 416 of The border settlers of Northwestern Virginia from 1768 to 1795, embracing the life of Jesse Hughes and other noted scouts of the great woods of the trans-Allegheny, with notes and illustrative anecdotes by Lucullus Virgil McWhorter ... with preface and additional notes by William Elsey Connelley and sketch of the author by J.P. MacLean ...

416 Border Settlers of Northwestern Virginia For some of the Indian names of streams in West Virginia, see Hale's Trans-Allegheny Pioneers; Cincinnati, 1886. Report of Archives and History of the State (3) Turkey Run This beautiful little valley, made historic by the Pringle Camp, received its name from the vast numbers of wild turkeys found there by the first settlers. The spot whereon grew the Pringle Sycamore, is on the land now owned by Mr. Webster Dix; on the west side of Turkey Run, about twenty-five feet from the stream and some forty to fifty feet from the bank of the Buckhannon River. Withers, p. 119, speaks of the stump of this tree as still standing in 1831. The late Hon. William C. Carper, of Buckhannon, remembered seeing it about 1848. The cavity was not less than twelve feet across. This stump disappeared many years ago and a second sycamore sprang up from the roots of the parent tree. This tree grew quite tall and straight. About the year 1880, it was blown down and washed away by a flood. But as if reluctant to fail to mark the site of the first primitive home of the white man in that region, the roots shot forth a second sprout and this grew into a bushy tree. It has a cavity in its trunk that will shelter two or three men from an ordinary storm. Mr. Dix has promised me that this historic land mark shall be protected. (4) Prof. A. L. Keith, of Carleton College, Northfield, Minn.; a great great grandson of John Pringle and Rebecca Simpson, is confident, after exhaustive research, that the two John Pringles are identical, and that Simpson the trapper and Simpson the slave holder were one and the same person. This, however, has not been truly verified. Several of the Kentucky Pringles were in the War of 1812. (5) See Chapter IX, this Volume. (6) For a further sketch of the Pringles, see Border Warfare. Also, Chapter XVIII, History of Upshur County, West Va., 1906. All references herein to the several County Histories of West Vigrinia, have been added since this volume was practically completed. (7) See Chapter XXXIV, this Volume, for notice of the belief in witchcraft. (8) Doddridge, in his Notes on the Settlement and Indian Wars of Virginia and Pennsylvania; Albany, 1876, pp. 140, 141, gives this description of the hunting shirt. of West Virginia; Charleston, 1906. The Pringle Sycamore of Today Courtesy of Air. M. C. Brake

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