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Image 16 of The Kentucky Kernel, May 10, 1957

Part of The Kentucky Kernel

KHNTI Ag-EngiiiecriiigCo- C KV Km NIX. TtUlw. Mav 10. 10"7 ROTC Units Inspected By Col. Grubbs urse Approved By ASAE FAST, EFFICIENT SERVICE . . . UK's agricultural aipiKrrin curriculum, which was organColonel William E. Grubbs, proized last year, has been approved by the American Society of fessor of military science and tacAgricultural Engineers. tics, UK, was recently selected by Announcement of the Society's notion was mnde Tuesday by Dr. nrnvton T. Kinard. head of the UK Department of Agricultural Engineering, and Ralph A. Talmer, n.istnnt secretary of the ASAE. The program was described by the ASAE as "a good, solid engineering schedule of studies." "Your course outline adequately covers the necessary basic physical scicnces, engineering and agricultural sciences and technological courses to be considered an approved professional curriculum." C. O. Downing, chairman of the education research division, said. Under the ruler, of accreditation, the Department operates as a part of the College of Agriculture and Jlome Economics and the College of Engineering, and degrees arc awarded jointly by the two col- I Revenue I rograin Planned For July A training program for the state Department of Revenue is being planned by the College of Adult and Extension Education. The two week program, to be held on the campus July 5 will be attended by about of the Department's field staff. They will study basic accounting, communications, public speaking and report writing. Instructors will be members of the UK faculty. Ihe Department of Workshops and Conferences of the College of Adult and Extension Education is in charge of the program. It is leges. employees Dr. Kinard. In explaining the intended to help state as well as further their education, importance of the curriculum, said between UK increase Ihe country's agricultural engineer- and the state government. ing divisions are turning out only about 300 graduates each year. This is far short of the goal of 1,000 necessary to meet the demand, he added. 15-2- 7, C0-G- on Tivo $300 Granls To Be Given By Engineering Shortage Is 'Accepted Thing,' E. 15. farris Reports 'There has been an engineer shortage for so long that it has become the accepted thing," said E. B. Farris, chief engineer of the Division of Maintenance and Operations. ""Farris said the same thing is being experienced in mathematics, chemistry, and physics. He said you can hardly convince fcmart graduates toreturn to the campus and teach. He added you cannot get girls to teach mathematics because they can make more money as secretaries. Farris said the whole thing .should be approached to train men from a technical viewpoint. "Give them junior college degrees as; jrarns engineering technicians, added. "We cannot afford to say we are going to reduce our standards in engineering'," Farris said. Southern Slates Two new scholarships have been made available to men in the College of Agriculture Dr. Stanley Wall, associate dean of the College of Agriculture and Home Eco nomics, announced. The Southern States Association has set up two four-yescholarships of $300 each. Two new recipients will be picked at the end of each year so that there will be eight in school at the end of four under this program. Howard Gordon, assistant to the general manager of Southern States, will meet with the Scholarship Committee to plan this the commanding general, Second Armv. as president of a board of six officers to make an annual formal inspection of ROTC units at colleges and universities in Pennsylvania. Other officers designated as" Colonel team members Joined Grubbs at Temple University, Philadelphia, Monday. May G for inspection of that unit. Tuesday, the team inspected Lafayette College at Easton, and on Wednesday, the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia. Today the team will inspect ROTC facilities at Lehigh University, Bethlehem. Five other units at colleges and universities will be inspected by the team over a period of nine days, starting again on Monday. May 13. with LaSalle College at Philadelphia, and finishing with Pennsylvania State University, University Park, on Thursday. The team has been instructed to render a report to the Commanding General of the results found with a recommendation as to which of the units should be awarded the Department of the Army Proficiency Certificate. Hill feb. dry Top-flig- cleaning at moderate rates You can depend on us to giye your clothes individual cleaning and pressing attention. We're so thorough that we'll sew on loose buttons and re- pair small rips. SAVE 15 PHONE hi 4-23- CARRY-OUTr 66 T V H Past Presidents Of UK Alumni To Be Honored Twenty-fiv- e living past presidents of the University of Kentucky Alumni Association will be honored Saturday, May 25, at UK's annual Alumni Day program. The honorees are Dr. G. Davis Buckner, Dr. George II. Wilson. Dr. E. Cronley Elliott, E. C. Robinson, LeRoyMiles. J. Stephen Watkins, Edwin R. Denney, William H. Townsend, Dr. Marius E. Johnston, Mrs. Charles Judson Smith. James Park. Marcus C. Redwine, William W. Blanton, Thomas II. Cutler, H. D. Palmore, Louis Cox. Charles I. Dawson, Homer L. In 1841 the Brook Farm experi- Baker, G. Lee McClain. John R. ment was a socialistic community Bullock. R. R. Dawson, Newton W. Neal, Will Ed Covington, Rodman founded at West Roxbury. Mass. Pierre Charles L'Enfant. French Wiley, and Keen Johnson. engineer, planned the layout of Gov. A. B. Chandler will preWashington, D. C. sent the past presidents with testimonial certificates during the alumni banquet Saturday night in the Student Union Ballroom. If You Do Business At All In addition to the banquet, the Do If With Alumni Day program includes a picnic at 12:30 p.m. at the recently acquired University farm on the Newtown Pike; the annual CAMPUS AGENT Alumni Association meeting im" mediately following the picnic and HOSPITALIZATION AND LIFE INSURANCE President and Mrs. Frank G. "SAVINGS AND SECURITY" Dickey's reception from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. at Maxwell Place. Provident Mutual Life Tickets for the .picnic are $1.50 Insurance Co. of Phila. each, and the banquet tickets are FOUNDED 186S $2.50 each. They may be purPHONE chased at the Alumni Office in LANE ALLEN ROAD 606 the Student Union Building. ve CORNER LIME AND EUCLID ar .. JACK HALL 4-52- r 94 ..w.'.v.v.vv .v.'.v.vmw.wuw.'aw. '.'.vaia'.v.'.,.w.,.,.,.,.v.w.'.v.v. v.v.V- - - v .. v.v. v. v v.s.vuyv-V.- -. vjlv. .w. v. ATTENTION ft MY FAIR OXFORD Scene: The London drawing room of Professor Moriarity Kitchener, philologist and elocutionist. As curtain rises, Kitchener is singing and dancing. Kitchener: Why can't the English learn how to speak? Hey? Why can't a woman he like a man? What? Why can't anybody grow accustomed to my Enter Cat shy Donothing, a chimney sweep. Donothing: P'arn me,. Perfi-zK, oi w'd loik tao lorn 'ow do spike e'en batterwise thun er Now The Time i o oer t our Is V INVITATIONS and CAPS-an- d Kitchener: Ugh! (Aside) Yet, he's a challenge. (To Donothing) All right, Toathsome, in six weeks, you'll be speaking well enough to go to the Coronation Ball! Six weeks later. X GOWNS Corj., 417 Fifth Ave., New York lti, N. Y. Phillips-Jone- s At 1 Campus Book Store button-- The Style Center of Lexington GET YOURS NOW! AVOID THE RUSH! - Kitchener: Oh, my Aunt Sally, the blighter hasn't learned a thing. I'm lost. But wait. I'll dress him in a Van Heusen Oxford cloth shirt. Then he'll pass as a gentleman for sure! All I have to do is be sure he keeps his big mouth shut. I'm saved, but good! (Curtain) Yes, friends, there's nothing like Van iieusen Oxford cloth shirts to make a gentleman of you. Whether you prefer downs, other collars, white or colors, see Van Heusen first. And buy. $5. face? So? SENIORS! I 1 Donothing: Sao, Prayfooser K, can yez thank what me spikes gentmanly aynuf naow? Do we be gung to Coronation Ball towgedder? K

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