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Image 8 of 1965 Kentuckian Centennial Year

Part of University of Kentucky Yearbook Collection

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a. £ a^-M Teaching ... a traditional university role Teaching is believed to be one of the oldest arts known to man. When we first think of teaching we automatically picture a professor lecturing to a class or the many hours spent working in lab. However, the student must make a contribution if he is to benefit from the teaching process. He cannot merely sit in a classroom staring at the blackboard—he must respond to the information presented. He must investigate to see why a law is so stated or question the accuracy of a fact in history. By exploring all these possibilities, the student builds upon the foundation that the instructor has provided. Through participating in class, experimenting and practicing, the student learns to perfect his field of study. Knowledge is available, but the student must seek it. A student spends only a fraction of his college life in the classroom—what he does with his time outside of the classroom probably will develop the full meaning of learning. Additional reading in the library, quiet study in his room and independent research often means the difference between success and failure. Indian summer moved the classroom outdoors. Classrooms in the new commerce building are a contrast to those in White Hall.

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