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Page 562 of Life of Joseph Brant : (Thayendanegea) : including the border wars of the American revolution and sketches of the Indian campaigns of Generals Harmar, St. Clair, and Wayne, and other matters connected with the Indian relations of the United States and Great Britain : from the peace of 1783 to the Indian peace of 1795.

562 appendix. under the impression that it would lead me to the abode of some white people, and by travelling it about one mile, I came to an uninhabited cabin; and though I was in a river bottom, yet I knew not where I was, nor yet on what river bank I had come. Here I was seized with the feelings of despair, and under those feelings I went to the threshold of the uninhabited cabin, and concluded that I would enter and lie down and die; as death would have been to me an angel of mercy in such a situation, and would have removed me from all my misery. Such were my feelings at this distressing moment, and had it not been for the recollection of those sufferings which my infant would endure, who would survive for some time after I was dead, I should have carried my determination into execution. Here, too, I heard the sound of a cow-bell, which imparted a gleam of hope to my desponding mind. I followed the sound of the bell till I came opposite to the fort at the Six Mile Island. When I came there, I saw three men on the opposite hank of the river. My feelings at the sight of these were better felt than described. I called to the men, but they seemed unwilling to risk the danger of coming after me, and requested to know who I was. I replied that I was one who had been taken prisoner by the In-dians on the Alleghany river on last Tuesday morning, and hud made my escape from them. They requested me to walk up the bank of the river for a while, that they might see if the Indians were making a decoy of me or not; but I replied to them that my feet were so sore that I could not walk. Then one of them, James Closier, got into a canoe to fetch me over, and the other two stood on the bank, with their rifles cocked, ready to tire on the Indians, provided they were using me as a decoy. When Mr. Closier came near to the shore, and saw my haggard and dejected situation, he exclaimed, " who, in the name of God, are you?" This man was one of my nearest neighbors before I was taken ; yet in six days I was so much altered that he did not know me. either by my voice or my countenance. When I landed on the inhabited side of the river, the people from the fort came running out to the boat to see me : they took the child from me, and now I felt safe from all danger, I found myself unable to move or to assist myself in any degree: whereupon the people took me and carried me out of the boat to the bouse of Mr. Cortus. Here, when I felt I was secure from the ravages and cruelties of the barbarians, for the first time since my captivity my feelings returned with all their poignancy. When I was dragged from my bed and from my home, a prisoner with the savages; when the in-

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